Ted Bundy’s Final Confessions: Commentary & Analysis
#1
Book 
Ted Bundy’s Final Confessions
Commentary & Analysis
Interview Date: January 22, 1989
Location: Starke, Floгida 
Interviewer: Dennis Couch



"We can do something good" what in the fuck is he talking about?? He didn't even give them that many answers, he didn't even help them that much. He held things back. I guess by "we can do something good" he just means he'll do like a COUPLE of good deeds to not even come close to balancing out all the bad shit. What a guy.

Get the man a fuckin' map! "It used to be a problem back when I lived there" ROFL, darn, those pesky maps! It all looks the same, always one challenge right after another when you're trying to find an optimal spot to hide the body eh?! Oh he needs a HIGH RESOLUTION MAP, he needs a TOPOGRAPHY MAP. Well, fuck us! This guy is full of shit.

"You could spend several lifetimes looking for something there"... this guy is creepy as shit y'all. Very strange statement wherein he gives away some of his deeper spiritual beliefs. We're definitely dealing with someone who believes in reincarnation and doesn't even take his life or anyone else's life seriously because of those beliefs. Ted is an extreme example of taking this reincarnation belief too far... the philosophy that we're all born and live again doesn't excuse the vicious killing of innocents.

9:15 "Whatever the most efficient way was during those days" like what the fuck was this guy's perception of time? He was in prison for a decade, not 100 years. It's just so weird. 

10:50 Ted denies carving his name on the trees, but this type of behavior is also ritualistic and ties into the theory that killing was a highly ritualistic and spiritual practice to him. If there were any bodies in those areas and he didn't want them to know because he was trying to protect his sacred sites, then of course he would tell them that he didn't carve his name on those trees.

He keeps criticizing the quality of the map stating that he needs one that shows dirt roads and so on. In a way it's understandable, and of course we can't see the map he was given in order to be able to determine how specific he could have gotten with it. But the fact of the matter is, Ted Bundy liked to visit the sites where he discarded his victims several times, therefore he had to know how to find them again. It's more likely that he's just playing mind games with the investigator.

13:20 he says he "turned left" at that small town with the flashing amber lights, which is so non-specific anyway, I bet that he is completely misleading them and telling them the opposite of the real directions.

15:25 there is absolutely no logical reason that he should have to focus on "one at a time"... this man is an unimaginable bastard. 

17:25 he says it was a dirt road, but earlier he had said that the road with the gate was paved. Is he literally making this up on the spot? 

21:20 everything's always "on the left".

22:35 "How deep was the grave?" and Ted can't even answer this question in a reasonable timeframe. I mean it couldn't have been that deep, could it? It takes a while to dig a deep hole. He said that he returned to SLC in the same night, so he couldn't have spent that much time digging a hole. For example, SLC to Price UT is a two hour drive. Ephraim UT is also a 2 hour drive if he really was on Highway 89 as he claimed, which I seriously doubt.

It sounds like he's just taking forever to answer their questions because he knows there's a limited time they can spend interviewing him and he wants to waste as much of it as he can.

"There's just nothing open at all" in reference to his schedule the next day when they were discussing getting better maps. So it's clear at this point that he was just trying to use the map quality to buy more time. He decides that approach is a lost cause, so it's at this point in the interview that he switches gears... into a much lower speed. 

Wow, Ted was a real snooze to talk to.

36:36 "You haven't slept for a while have you?" The problem isn't that Ted was tired, the problem was that he had entered into this interview with absolutely no intention of actually being helpful. Once his approach of trying to buy more time with the maps failed, there was no incentive for him to work with them at all anymore. He didn't want to give away the details of the encounters with his victims, they were sacred to him.
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#2
And yes I completely realize that the video is no longer available...

Apparently this interview is super hard to find. It's just audio.

It was on YouTube a while back...

I commentated on it but I never posted it.

I was gonna write a book about Ted Bundy but then...

Well, I'd like to say I got high. But I literally didn't.

I just...

Didn't write the fucking book.

ROFL

Those missed opportunities thoughhh!!!

Books are so 20th century anyway, now it's internet blog posts.
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#3
Oh nevermind, I found another upload of it...

What the fuck!?

I'll just put that in the OP then.
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#4
Wonder why the other one got removed.
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#5
Here's another thread where we analyze the absolute shit out of Ted Bundy:

http://www.sectual.com/thread-2645.html
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#6
I'll post another bit I wrote...
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#7
I believe that Ted Bundy was ultimately too evil and corrupt, even for the political groups he tried to be a part of. They knew there was something wrong with him, something uncontrollable that was so deeply engrained in his being. I think they knew that he could endanger their groups and cause problems for them in the future with his impulsive behavior.

Jeffrey Dahmer wanted to sit in a regal black chair in front of an altar table displaying his most prized trophies: the remains of his favorite victims. Some say that Ted incorporated ritual into his killings as well. We know that he would return to the remains of his victims and put makeup on them, brush their hair, and carry out all kinds of other strange activities. Darker still, some suggest that Ted performed ritualistic sacrifices in wilderness locations like caves and desert settings. It seems that Ted loved to kill, whether it was for some kind of spiritual purpose, or just for a fix. He was an addict. There are investigators out there who know details about the ritualistic elements of the murders Ted committed, but they haven't openly discussed them. It is my opinion that they should discuss these details, or at least write about them before the information is lost to time.

It's easy to assume Ted enjoyed killing. However, he talked about an "entity" as if to say he was being possessed when he committed these heinous acts. Did Ted have spiritual beliefs and take part in spiritual practices that could have made him vulnerable to possession? Was Ted just using the concept of possession as an excuse? Was he using the concept of possession as an example of the way in which his addiction would cause impulses that he simply couldn't control?

The suggestion that the trauma of finding out his “sister” was actually his mother was the catalyst for his murderous behavior greatly angered Ted. In my opinion, his strong reaction to this idea suggests that indeed it probably was a huge part of the problem. I also think Ted himself may have been conceived out of rape, after all, no one knows who his father was and the excuses about who he was aren’t very cohesive.
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#8
(03-08-2019, 05:51 PM)Mister Obvious Wrote: Was he using the concept of possession as an example of the way in which his addiction would cause impulses that he simply couldn't control?

That's what I think.
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#9
If you were wandering around in the woods looking for a place to bury a body, you'd remember certain features of the terrain. A topographical map would be a lot more helpful than a political map in finding the place again. If he were alive today, he'd be able to see the exact spot on Google Earth.
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#10
He fucked dead people, I don't wanna fuck them, I just see them, wish I didn't though :(
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#11
My theory and what I assume is that when Ted worked for the suicide hotline, he was procuring victims.

Back in the early days, he wanted to kill people, but he had a moral hangup about it...

So he decided that he'd find a way to kill people who already wanted to die anyway.

My guess is he probably got details from some of these people he talked to, like their name and maybe where they went to school etc., and tracked them down using those details.

The only issue with the theory is that if he successfully talked people 'down from the ledge' and they didn't want to die anymore... that would throw a monkey wrench into things on a moral level.

So perhaps he only pursued people who he felt he wasn't successful in 'talking down' or people he figured would just relapse into wanting to kill themselves.
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#12
It's actually pretty brilliant.
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#13
Beeyoutitfull mo, dont forget rub those perky nipples for me tonight darling. God made you for me , my little bunny ...and i worship his gift. I wanna umdress you for your husband who likes to watch so he can learn about romance
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#14
I was never "into" serial killers in the way some people were. My interest was in a "case study of human behavior"
sort of way. Of how a person could be the guy next door, a friendly bank teller or cashier at the local market and
turn out to be a Jeffrey Dahmer.

Speaking of which, I always had a soft spot in my heart for Dahmer. Let me finish, haha, for the person I feel
he could've been were he not so badly warped and broken. I think his father was responsible for untold amounts
of abuse. Going on impressions I got watching several interviews with both Jeffrey and his father. And if it wasn't
him, it came from somewhere. Not ruling out "possession" or just badly defective wiring, but I feel it was more
environmental.

He [Jeffrey Dahmer] just always struck me as someone that had a great capacity for kindness and compassion but
was obviously and violently pushed onto the wrong path. Again, who or what is to blame is anybody's guess. I just
don't think it was inherent evil that caused him to do what he did.

I always felt sorry for him, like he was the victim of some super fucked up identity theft. I am in NO WAY excusing
any of what he did. Regardless of how he arrived on that dark path, he was there and very much present during
every last act. He admitted to knowing what he was doing was wrong, but said he was powerless to stop it.

It's a terrible thing to see a life turned into such a tragedy, not to mention the poor victims and the surviving
families. As beautiful as this world can sometimes appear, there also remains great potential for brutal savagery.
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#15
(05-08-2019, 11:37 PM)somethingelseishere Wrote: Of how a person could be the guy next door, a friendly bank teller or cashier at the local market and
turn out to be a Jeffrey Dahmer.

That’s why I don’t entirely trust Ann Rule’s “The Stranger Beside Me” assessment of Ted... she didn’t even know there was anything wrong with him while they were working the suicide hotline together. So at the time, was she listening (COULD she hear?) to what he was saying to the people he was talking to? Probably not.

He even told her when they worked together that she should practice safety at night going out to her car, don’t sit around with the door open, lock the door as soon as you get in, etc. he was being helpful but at the same time it demonstrates his mind being preoccupied with violence even at that point/in that setting.

Ann Rule had a chance to make a bunch of money from having known Ted, and she did. That’s not to say there isn't valid info in her book, I’m sure there is... I’ve never read it. But I think it takes a certain kinda mind to really understand what the fuck Ted was doing.


(05-08-2019, 11:37 PM)somethingelseishere Wrote: I think his father was responsible for untold amounts
of abuse. Going on impressions I got watching several interviews with both Jeffrey and his father. And if it wasn't
him, it came from somewhere.

You could be right... there was some strangeness between them. Or just the way he acted in the presence of his father. Definitely something odd but, I’d have to question his mother too...

http://twistedminds.creativescapism.com/...ey-dahmer/

If he was sexually abused by a neighbor, that would go a long way in explaining things. But combine that with any home abuse and it makes sense he’d turn out warped.
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#16
I just watched Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile on Netflix. While the film doesn't go into Bundy's motives, it's a very accurate portrayal of events, right down to re-enacting scenes verbatim and casting actors who look just like the real people.


Bundy's first confession apparently came when Elizabeth Kloepfer, aka Liz Kendall, visited him in prison one last time before his execution. Throughout the visit, he vehemently denied he committed the crimes until the very end. Liz finally asked him what happened to the head of a decapitated victim, and he replied by writing "hacksaw" on the dirty window of the visiting booth with his finger. As Bundy still hoped to convince the world of his innocence at that point, he quickly erased it before anyone else could see it.
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#17
(05-10-2019, 10:35 AM)Guest Wrote: I just watched Extremely Wicked, Shockingly Evil and Vile on Netflix.

LMFAOLOLOL I can’t believe that’s ACTUALLY the name of it!!!

I was talking to my mom when she read the title aloud as she was browsing Netflix, she was like “I guess that’s the name of it!” And I just thought nah, she’s gotta be reading the description or something. I made the remark that light loafered Zac Efron playing Ted is the manilest thing he’s ever done. LMFAO!!!

As far as fingering ‘hacksaw’ on the window, that sounds like a load of BS to me. Doesn’t sound like some shit he’d do and since the only witness is some bitch, well LOL... I’m guessing we can’t consider it the gospel truth. She probably misread it if it happened at all, and yes I am aware they knew each other from college.
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#18
(05-10-2019, 10:43 AM)Mister Obvious Wrote: LMFAOLOLOL I can’t believe that’s ACTUALLY the name of it!!!


Those were the exact words of the presiding judge in his Florida conviction in response to Ted's final statements.


(05-10-2019, 10:43 AM)Mister Obvious Wrote: I was talking to my mom when she read the title aloud as she was browsing Netflix, she was like “I guess that’s the name of it!” And I just thought nah, she’s gotta be reading the description or something.


For real. I skipped over the movie when I saw the title at first because it sounded like some decadent-for-the-sake-of-decadence Hollywood crap. I didn't know it was about Bundy until someone told me.


(05-10-2019, 10:43 AM)Mister Obvious Wrote: As far as fingering ‘hacksaw’ on the window, that sounds like a load of BS to me.


I would ordinarily agree, but the rest of the movie was so uncompromisingly accurate in every detail that it doesn't seem likely they would go off script by throwing in that one little bit of bullshit.
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#19
(05-10-2019, 10:55 AM)Guest Wrote: Those were the exact words of the presiding judge in his Florida conviction in response to Ted's final statements.

I figured that, but for a movie title... come on!!! ROFL!!!

Thanks for posting about this though!!!

As a Ted Bundy expert I should probably watch it and take it apart minute by minute...

Banana
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#20
(05-10-2019, 11:02 AM)Mister Obvious Wrote: I figured that, but for a movie title... come on!!! ROFL!!!

Thanks for posting about this though!!!

As a Ted Bundy expert I should probably watch it and take it apart minute by minute...

Banana

It's a good movie and worth watching, but a Ted Bundy expert probably won't learn anything they don't already know from it.
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